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Commissioning 

USS WASP (LHD 1) 

29 July 1989 
Norfolk, Virginia 




THE TRADITION OF COMMISSIONING A SHIP 




J. he Commissioning Ceremony 
signifies the acceptance for service 
and the entry of a ship into the 
active fleet of the United States 
Navy. At the moment of the break- 
ing of the commissioning pennant, 
USS WASP (LHD 1) becomes a 
proud ship of the hne. The Com- 
manding Officer, together with the 
ship's officers and crew, then 
accepts the duties and responsibih- 
ties of making and keeping her 
ready for any service required by 
our nation, whether at peace or at 
war. The naval Commissioning 
Ceremony has been a tradition of all 
navies for centuries and in the 
United States Navy since its begin- 
ning; it marks the formal entrance 
of a man-of-war into the naval 
forces of her nation. It is the final 
and perhaps the most significant 
event of the triad that brings a ship 
to life: keel laying, launching and 
christening, and commissioning. 
In the early periods of our Navy's 



history, no exact procedure for the 
commissioning ceremony was 
prescribed. Thus, a ship's date of 
commissioning was recorded as any 
one of a number of days — when the 
colors were first raised, when 
officers and crew reported on board, 
when the first log entry was made, 
or when the ship first put out to sea. 
Throughout the years, however, one 
visible and significant manifestation 
of the commissioned ship has 
remained constant: active ships of 
the United States Navy, from days 
of the handsome frigates under sail 
to the era of the nuclear powered 
ships, have proudly fiown a commis- 
sioning pennant and the "Stars and 
Stripes." 

The commissioning pennant has 
for centuries been the unique 
symbol of the man-of-war. Today, as 
the distinctive mark of a ship in 
commission, it is flown except when 
displaced by the personal flag of an 
Admiral or Commodore aboard the 



ship. The origin of the commission- 
ing pennant, like many of our 
traditions, can be traced to the 
British Navy. After whipping an 
adversary, the British thereafter 
hoisted a long, narrow commission- 
ing pennant in remembrance of the 
original horsewhip as its distinctive 
symbol of a man-of-war — a tradition 
adopted by many world navies. 
From its commissioning day 
forward, USS WASP will assume a 
unique personality, building upon 
the will, spirit and dedication of 
those who serve in this WASP and 
those who have served on the nine 
previous WAPSs. USS WASP will 
embody the "Honor, Tradition, and 
Excellence " of these WASPs as she 
sails throughout the world's oceans. 

We firmly believe that your 
presence here today will ensure us 
"fair winds and a following sea " in 
all that lies ahead. 

Thank you for coming. 



CREST AND SHIELD OF USS WASP (LHD 1) 




SHIELD 

Dark blue and gold are the tradi- 
tional Navy colors. Blue alludes to 
the sea, the theater of naval opera- 
tions. Gold is for excellence. The 
chevron, a traditional symbol for 
support, represents the amphibious 
assault mission of the ship. It re- 
sembles a wave moving to shore and 
refers to the deployment of men and 
cargo. The wings highlight USS 
wasp's aviation heritage and 
capabilities. The modern ship with 
crossed officer sword and enlisted 
cutlass adapted from the surface 
warfare emblem represents leader- 
ship, team work and the ship's 
mission in surface warfare opera- 
tions. The pile or (sharply pointed 
"V" shape) is expressive of assault, 
combat readiness and victory. The 
counterchange of colors emphasizes 
this ship's capability to integrate sea, 
air and land combat missions to 



make an amphibious assault. The 
shield is divided into nine sections 
honoring the nine previous ships 
named "WASP. " 

CREST 

The wasp, with its well developed 
wings and ability to administer 
painful stings, epitomizes quick 
striking power. The stars recall two of 
the past USS WASPs, CV-7 and CV- 
18, aircraft carriers that earned two 
and eight battle stars respectively for 
World War II service. The red disk or 
sun refers to World War II Japan and 
the Pacific Theater where these 
aircraft carriers saw heavy combat 
action. The tridents are symbolic of 
sea power and weaponry. 

MOTTO 

On a scroll azure edged are the words 

HONOR, TRADITION, EXCELLENCE. 



SHIP'S CHARACTERISTICS AND MISSION 



Amphibious Assault Ship USS WASP (LHD 1) 




LENGTH: 

BEAM: 

DISPLACEMENT: 

SPEED: 

AIRCRAFT: 



LANDING CRAFT: 



844 Feet 
106 Feet 
40,500 Tons 
20+ Knots 

AH-IT Cobra, UH-IN Huey, CH- 
46E Sea Knight, CH-53D Sea 
Stallion, CH-53E Super Stallion, 
AV-8B Harrier, SH-60B Sea 
Hawk 

Air Cushion Landing Craft 
(LCAC) Alternates: Utility 
Landing Craft (LCU), Medium 
Landing Craft (LCM), Amphibi- 
ous Assault Vehicle (LVTP-7) 



ACCOMMODATIONS: 



PROPULSION: 



ARMAMENT: 



MEDICAL/DENTAL: 



Crew: 1,080; Embarked Troops: 
1,870 

Two Conventional Steam 
Propulsion Plants, 70,000 Shp 
(Total) 

Three Phalanx Close In Weap- 
ons Systems (CIWS) Mounts 
Two Eight-Cell NATO Sea Spar- 
row Surface Missile System 
(NSSMS) Launchers 
Eight .50 Cal Machine Guns 
Six Medical Operating Rooms 
Four Dental Operating Rooms 
600 Bed Hospital 



X he mission of the Multipurpose 
Amphibious Assault Ship is to 
conduct prompt and sustained 
operations at sea. As the multipur- 
pose name implies, USS WASP will 
operate in support of a variety of 
warfare missions. Principally, 
WASP will operate as the center- 
piece of the Navy's amphibious 
groups. She will provide the means 
to transport, deploy and command 



all elements of a marine landing 
force in assault by air and amphibi- 
ous craft. Operating with a carrier 
or battleship battlegroup, WASP 
will provide aircraft and command/ 
control facilities for sea control 
missions. During peacetime, WASP 
will provide disaster relief in sup- 
port of humanitarian missions and 
establish naval presence, by show- 
ing the flag throughout the world. 



Sideview Antenna Arrangement 




PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES 



The Honorable George H. Bush 





SECRETAEY OF THE NAVY 



CHIEF OF NAVAL OPERATIONS 



The Honorable H. Lawrence Garrett, III Admiral C. A. H. Trost, USN 





^ 



THE SECRETARY OF THE NAVY 
WASHINGTON 



Captain Leonard F. Picotte, USN 

Prospective Commanding Officer, WASP ( LHD 1) 

Supervisor of Shipbuilding, 

Conversion and Repair, USN 
Pascagoula, Mississippi 39568-2210 

Dear Captain Picotte: 

Congratulations on your assumption of command, and best 
wishes to vou and to your crew on the commissioning of WASP 
(LHD 1). 

The tenth U.S. Navy ship to bea 
a tradition of excellence that exten' 
dence through World War II. The new. 
latest technology and the most moder 
can produce, and shall constitute a 
Navy-Marine Corps team. It remains 
bring her to life. I know that the 
of your fine crew will continue the 
accomplishment firmly established by 
have served under the name WASP. 

As you assume your place in the fleet, the men who serve 
in WASP are charged with the heavy responsibility of making 
her an instrument of peace through strength. I wish you every 
success in meeting the challenges which lie ahead. 



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^ 



lEF OF NAVAL OPERATIONS 



Dear Captain Picotte , 

Please accept my congratulations on the 
cominissioning of United States Ship WASP. An 
unusual distinction and a specia 1 responsibility 
falls upon you as her first commanding officer. 

WASP, the newest multipurpose assault ship in 
the fleet, and the first of her class, embodies the 
most modern design and construction on the seas 
today. However, she cannot fulfill the role for 
which she was author i zed by Congress, the defense 
of our nation, unless she is manned by a dedicated 
crew capable of operating and maintaining her to 
the limit of her potential. 

Your responsibii ity is to establish WASP's 
capabi lity. As your ship and crew perform, she 
will develop a reputation that will endure over her 
years of service. As the WASP's first commanding 
officer, her character will depend , in no small 
measure, upon your leadership. 

Your selection for this most important task is 
an honor. I have the fullest confidence you will 
execute your responsibilities well . 



//U?=^^ 



A. H. TROST 
Admiral, U.S. Navy 



Captain Leonard F. Picotte, USN 
PCO, WASP (LHD 1) 
Supervisor of Shipbuilding, 

Conversion and Repair, USN 
Pascagoula, MS 39568-2210 



COMMANDER IN CHIEF 
U.S. ATLANTIC FLEET 



COMMANDER NAVAL SURFACE FORCE 
U.S. ATLANTIC FLEET 



Admiral Powell F. Carter, Jr., USN 



Vice Admiral J. S. Donnell III, USN 





V 



Commander in Chief U S Atlantic Fleet 



Dear Captain Plcotte . 

I would like to extend my beet wlabea to you and 
your crew as you oommlaslon the Navy ' a neweat combatant, 
OSS WASP (LHD-n - 

By utilizing the lateet technology In personnel 
and cargo lift, and over- the-hor 1 zon aaaault, W&SP and 
her f ol low- on claas of amphlbloua tranaport shlpa will 
greatly enhance our Fleet capabllltlea for putting men 
and equipment aahore. Th 1 a versatility, combined with 
a superior combat aul te . will ouke you the corneratone 
of our amphibious battle group for years to come. 

The many hours of training your fine crew baa 
undergone have made tbem more than ready for the 
challenge ahead. The enthusiasm, commitment, and 
dedication of your crew is already visible in the 
outstanding seamanship and professionalism they 
displayed in making WASP ready to put to sea. 

It is with a great deal of admiration and pride 
that I welcome you to the Atlantic Fleet. 




POWELL F. CABTEB. 
Admiral , U.S. Navy/ 



Captain Leonard Plcotte 

PCO 033 WASP (LED 1) 

C/0 SUPSHIP Converaion and Repair 

United States yavy 

Paacagoula. US 30968-3310 



V 



COMMANDER 



FACE FORCE 



Dear Captain Picotte, 

Congratulations ana best wishes to you and 
your superb crew on the commissioning of USS WASP 
CLHD 1) . 

The modern technology and increased amphibious 
lift capability the USS V.ASP brings to the Atlantic 
Fleet will provide a valuable asset to our warfare 
capability. Your ship, by virtue of her over-the- 
horizon assault capability and impressive combat 
syster.s suite, will be the new centerpiece of the 
amphioious task force. 

Your crew has earned my sincere admiration for 
their tireless efforts in preparing USS WASP for 
active service. I am confident that the spirit and 
teamwork so evident in your precommissioning efforts 
will continue as you join the force. 

On behalf of the Naval Surface Force, U.S. 
Atlantic Fleet, I extend to each member of the crew 
a hearty "welcome aboard." We are proud to have 
USS WASP as a member of our team. 

Sincerely , 



Navy 



S. DONNELL III 
Vice Admiral, U.S. 



DEPUTY CHIEF OF NAVAL OPERATIONS 
(SURFACE WARFARE) 



COMMANDER 

NAVAL SEA SYSTEMS COMMAND 



Vice Admiral J. W. Nyquist, USN 



Vice Admiral P. M. Hekman, Jr., USN 





V 



THE ASSISTANT CHIEF OF NAVAL OPERATIONS 

(SURFACE WARFARE) 
WMhtnglon 



Dear Captain Picotte, 

On behalf of the entire Surface Warfare 
community, it is my pleasure to congratulate you 
and your crew on the commissioning of USS WASP 

(LHD 1) . 

WASP is the most capable amphibious warship 
ever built. Her aviation, command and control and 
amphibious lift capabilities vastly exceed that of 
her predecessors. The advanced technology built 
into WASP is the finest America has to offer. 

You and your crew have already invested long 
hours of concentrated effort to make the Navy's 
newest warship ready for service in the fleet. As 
you hone your skills and build upon your 
experience, your teamwork and expertise in setting 
a standard of excellence will give this warship 
her personal ity, vital ity and reputation. 

I congratulate you on the occasion of this 
commissioning and cheer your progress as WASP 
proudly joins the fleet. 




^UIST '^ 



Vice Admiral, U, S. Navy 



Captain Leonard F. Picotte, USN 
Prospective Commanding Officer 
WASP (LHD 1) 
Pascagoula, MS 39568-2210 



^ 



Dear Captain Picotte, 

Congratulations to you and your outstanding 
crew on the commissioning of USS WASP. 

Having sailed with you during Builder's Trials, 
I have seen firsthand the magnificent warfighting 
capability that WASP, the tenth ship to bear this 
proud name, will bring to the Navy and Marine Corps 
team. She is an extremely valuable asset and will 
be an effective instrument of seapower in our 
nation's defense. I have complete confidence in 
the dedicated crew of profession a Is which you lead 
and their ability to meet the challenges ahead. 

I express my sincere appreciation to you and 
the crew for your dedicated and tireless efforts in 
preparing WASP for commissioned service. I am con- 
fident the high spirit and team effort displayed 
during WASP 's construction will continue "Full Speed 
Ahead. " 



Please extend to each me 
hearty "Welcome Aboard," We 
WASP as a member of our Navy. 



Tiber of the crew my 
n'lll be proud to have 




P. M. HEKMAN, JR.> 

Vice Admiral, U. S. Navy 



Captain Leonard F. Picotte, USN 
Prospective Commanding Officer 
USS WASP (LHD 1) 
Pascagoula, MS 39568-2210 



COMMANDER 
AMPHIBIOUS GROUP TWO 



COMMANDER 

AMPHIBIOUS SQUADRON TWELVE 



Rear Admiral G. E. Whisler, Jr., USN 



Captain T. S. Treanor, USN 





'"iBfc- 



Dear Captain Picotte, 



I'd like to take this oppor tun 
WASP as the newest member of Amphib 
Our amphibious forces of the future 
mission ships capable not only of C' 
traditional amphibious operations, 
providing over-the-horizon assault 
WASP meets this demand and will be 
takes out amphibious forces into th 
Your ability to operate the Landing 
Cushion and a wide variety of aircr 
and fixed wing make you our most fo 
platform. Additionally, you bring 
one of the most sophisticated comma 
communicat ions and intelligence sui 
today. 



ity to welcome 
ious Group TWO. 

must be multi- 
onduct ing 
but also 
capabi li t ies . 
the ship that 
e 21st Century . 

Craft Air 
af t , both rotary 
rmidable assau It 
to the amphibians 
nd , control , 
tes in the Navy 



The name WASP carries a proud tradition of 
exce Hence earning numerous battle stars during 
World War II and playing an active role in this 
nations early space prog ram. Your challenge will be 
to continue this tradition of excellence. 

No one is more important to a ship than her 
first crew and on this, the most important day in a 
ship's life, I extend my sincere congratulations and 
express my utmost thanks for the way in which you 
and your fine crew have prepared WASP for entry into 
the fleet. 

S incerely , 



G. E. WHISLER 
Rear Admi ral , 



Captain L. F. PICOTTE, USN 
PCO WAS? (LiID-1) 
Pascagoula, MS 39568-2210 




DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY 

COMMANDER AMPHIBIOIS SQUADRON T»HLVE 

NAVALSTATION 

NOBFOLfc.. VIRGINIA 2i5ll.ftW* 



Captain Leonard F. Picotte, LBN 
POJ *SP lum 1) 
Pascagoula, MS 39568-2210 

Dear Captain Picotte, 

on behalf of the entire COMPHIBFCM TkCLVE staff, I extend my best 
wishes to you and your crew on the occasion of the carmissioning of the 
USS \ftSP (LHD 1) . 

As the tenth ship to beat the nane VRSP, you have a great Naval 
tradition to uphold. You and your crew have invested long hours of 
concentrated effort to make the Navy's newest warship ready for service 
in the fleet ar^a a very valued addition to my team. As your ship and 
crew perform, vftSP will develop a reputation that will endure over her 
years of service, and 1 an confident you wiU meet every challenge in 
true Navy fashion. 

It is true pleasure that I welccroe 1*lSP to my sqjadron and the fleet. 
May she serve our Navy and country with distinction. 



TTSTTFEAtCfi I 

Captain, U.S. Navy 



PRINCIPAL SPEAKER 



General Alfred M. Gray, USMC 




G. 



feneral Alfred M. Gray is the 
Commandant of the Marine Corps, 
Headquarters Marine Corps, Wash- 
ington, D.C. 

Born in Rahway, New Jersey, 
General Gray enlisted in the 
Marine Corps in 1950. He served 
overseas with FMF, Pacific, attain- 
ing the rank of sergeant before 
being commissioned a second lieu- 
tenant in April 1952. Early tours 
included service with the 11th and 
7th Marines, 1st Marine Division in 
Korea, the 8th Marines, 2d Marine 
Division at Camp Lejeune, N.C., 
and Headquarters Marine Corps, 



Washington, D.C, during which he 
saw service in Guantanamo Bay 
and Vietnam. 

As a major, General Gray joined 
the 12th Marines, 3d Marine Divi- 
sion, Vietnam in October 1965, 
serving concurrently as regimental 
communications officer, regimental 
training officer, and artillery aerial 
observer. He took command of the 
Composite Artillery Battalion and 
U.S. Free World Forces at Gio Linh 
in April 1967. In September 1967, 
General Gray was reassigned to the 
III Marine Amphibious Force in Da 
Nang where he commanded the 1st 



Radio Battalion elements through- 
out I Corps until February 1968. 
Following a brief tour in the United 
States, he returned to Vietnam 
from June to September 1969 in 
conjunction with surveillance and 
reconnaissance matters in the I 
Corps area. 

After his Vietnam tour. General 
Gray served as Commanding 
Officer of the 1st Battalion, 2d 
Marines; Battalion Landing Team 
1/2; the 2d Marines; the 4th Ma- 
rines; and Camp Commander of 
Camp Hansen, Okinawa, Japan. 
While commanding the 33d Marine 
Amphibious Unit and Regimental 
Landing Team-4, and concurrently 
serving as Deputy Commander, 9th 
Marine Amphibious Brigade, 
General Gray directed the South- 
east Asia evacuation operations in 
1975. 

Advanced to brigadier general in 
March 1976, General Gray served 
as Commanding General, Landing 
Force Training Command, Atlantic, 
and the 4th Marine Amphibious 
Brigade. Promoted to major general 
in February 1980, he assumed 
command of the 2d Marine Divi- 
sion, FMF, Atlantic, Camp Lejeune, 
N.C., in June 1981. Following his 
promotion to lieutenant general on 
Aug. 29, 1984, he was reassigned as 
Commanding General, FMF, Atlan- 
tic/Commanding General, II MAF, 
and Commanding General, FMF, 
Europe. General Gray was pro- 
moted to general and became 
Commandant of the Marine Corps 
on July 1, 1987. 

He is married to the former Jan 
Goss of Burlington, Vermont. 



TRADITION OF THE SPONSOR 



M, 



.rs. Diane Wilcox Lawrence is 
wasp's sponsor. She is the wife of 
Vice Admiral William P. Lawrence, 
USN(R). 

It is believed that the spirit of the 
sponsor enters the ship at the chris- 
tening, and remains there for the 
life of the ship. The spirit helps the 
ship face the dangers of the sea. 

Until the middle of the 19th cen- 
tury, U.S. Navy ships were christen- 
ed by men. On 22 August 1846, the 
first woman ever to sponsor a Navy 
ship, Mrs. Lavinia Watson Fanning, 
christened the sloop of war GER- 
MANTOWN, at the Philadelphia 
Naval Shipyard. Since then, women 
have always christened Navy ships. 

Mrs. Lawrence, a native of Penn- 
sylvania, received a Bachelor of 
Science Degree in Zoology from the 
University of Arkansas and a Mas- 
ters Equivalent Degree in Physical 
Therapy from the University of 
Pennsylvania. She is Co-owner and 
Director of Rehab, Inc., a multidisci- 
plinary physical rehabilitation 
agency. The Lawrence's have four 
children and currently reside in 
Annapolis, Maryland. 




To the Men of WASP: 

The nine ships that have earlier borne this name 
have honored our country with courage and distinc- 
tion. You who serve in the tenth WASP, the first of a 
new class of magnificent ships, will continue a 
heritage of eminence and acclaim as you advance 
the case and commitment of our Country and our 
Navy. 

I am proud to be a part of this historic moment 
and wish you accomplishment, noble performance 
and pride of work. May God bless you all. 



Diane Wilcox Lawrence 



HONORARY COMMISSIONING COMMITTEE MEMBERS 




Senator John W. Warner Senator Charles S. Robb 




ADM Maurice R Weisner, GEN P. X. Kelley, USMC 

USN (Ret.) 



VADM William P. Lawrence, 

USN (Ret.) 



USS WASP COMMISSIONING COMMITTEE 





^^^^^^B ' fl^^E 








Front row, L-R ^ 

Joe Hunley ^H 

Carol Melatti ^H 

Chela Williams ^H 

COL Jim Pendergast ^^| 

COL Lee Starkey ( USA-Ret. ) ^^ 


0¥ 


Back row, L-R ^g^gl 

COL Edward Condra (USMC-Ret. ) B 

Susan Coe ^M 
Craige Rahl ^m 


MH ii 


1 


i i 


E^l^l 



Jim Milligan 
Julian Hirst 
Joseph Gianascoli 



Front row, L-R 

Jowe Penalosa 

Kay Griggs 

Arlene Fee 

Don Williams 

Nancy Creech 

CAPT Jerry Hesse (USN-Ret.) 

Back row, L-R 

Jerry Nelinson 

Kirk Hammaker (Co-chairman) 

CDR Jack Barry (Co-chairman) 

(USN-Ret.) 

Charles Gifford 

MCPON Bob Walker (USN-Ret.) 

Bill Hearst 




Photo not available 

Irvine Hill 

CAPT Benjamin Joyce (USN-Ret.) 

MCPON William Plackett 

(USN-Ret.) 

Kathy Harris 

CAPT Fred Ellis (USN-Ret.) 

Casey Holtzinger 



CHRISTENING 




WASP (LHD I) 

SPONSOR 



'n Saturday, September 19, 1987, 
WASP (LHD 1) was christened in 
ceremonies at Ingalls Shipbuilding 
division of Litton in Pascagoula, 
Mississippi. Mrs. Diane Wilcox 
Lawrence, wife of Retired Vice 
Admiral William P. Lawrence, a 
former Vice Chief of Naval Opera- 
tions, was selected by the Navy as 
"Ship's Sponsor" for LHD 1, and 
broke the traditional bottle of 
champagne across the new ship's 
bow, officially naming her ' WASP." 



CHRISTENING 



Vi 



ice Admiral Lawrence was prin- 
cipal speaker for the christening, 
and stated "Ships such as this, and 
the sailors and Marines who will 
sail in her, play a major role in the 
protection of the freedoms provided 
for all Americans by our 
Constitution. She is a quantum 
advancement in the amphibious 
warfare capability of our Navy and 
Marine Corps ... a credit to the 
Navy and to Ingalls Shipbuilding." 

Captain Laurie Lawrence Deneke, 
a U.S. Army physician stationed at 
Fort Campbell, Kentucky, and Mrs. 
Marguerite Cottrell Rauch, of North 
Starington, Connecticut, served as 
Matrons of Honor for the ceremony. 
Lieutenant Wendy B. Lawrence, a 
U.S. Navy helicopter pilot stationed 
in Belmont, Massachusetts, was 
Maid of Honor. Captain Deneke and 
Lieutenant Lawrence are daughters 
of Vice Admiral and Mrs. Lawrence. 
Mrs. Rauch is the couple's daughter- 
in-law. 

Also participating in the christen- 
ing, which was attended by more 
than 1,500 guests, were: Vice Ad- 
miral William F. McCauley, USN, 
Commander, Naval Surface Force, 
U.S. Atlantic Fleet; Lieutenant 
General Anthony Lukeman, USMC, 
Deputy Assistant Secretary of De- 
fense, Military Manpower and Per- 
sonnel Policy; Eugene Shoults, 
Amphibious Warfare and Strategic 
Sealift Program Manager, Naval 
Sea Systems Command; Captain 
Michael G. Simpson, USN, Supervi- 
sor of Shipbuilding, Conversion and 
Repair, Pascagoula; and Jerry St. 
Pe', Senior Vice President of Litton 
and President of Ingalls Shipbuild- 
ing. 




WASP (LHD 1) 

SPONSOR 



Litton 

Inyalls Shipbuilding 



CONSTRUCTION 



Uj 



SS WASP (LHD 1) is the lead 
ship in a new class of multipurpose 
amphibious assault ships — the U.S. 
Navy/Marine Corps team's newest 
class of amphibious warships — 
being built by Ingalls Shipbuilding 
division of Litton in Pascagoula, 
Mississippi. 

Ingalls has been a major ship- 
builder for the U.S. Navy and 
Merchant Marine fleets since 1938. 
The WASP Class, of which Ingalls 
has four ships under contract, is the 
sixth amphibious assault ship 
program in which Ingalls has been 
involved since the early 1950s. Most 
recently, the five ships of the TAR- 
AWA (LHA 1) Class were delivered 
to the Navy by Ingalls between 1976 
and 1980. The TARAWA Class 
provided much of the baseline from 
which the design of the all-new 
WASP Class was developed. 

The 844-foot long, 40,500-ton 
WASP was built utilizing efficient, 
Ingalls-pioneered preoutfitting and 
modular construction techniques. 
Those techniques were refined in 
the construction of LHD 1 to employ 
the most extensive engineering 
design and ship production coordi- 
nation ever utilized in U.S. Navy 



shipbuilding history. As a result of 
this design and production coordina- 
tion, piping sections, ventilation 
ducting and other related shipboard 
hardware were installed in smaller 
subassemblies of the ship while 
those subassemblies were in the 
inverted position. 

This early preoutfitting maxi- 
mized downhand' rather than 
overhead' fitting and installation of 
shipboard hardware and allowed 
craftsmen easy access to their 
production work areas, which, in 
the conventional shipbuilding 
process, would be deep within the 
completed ship hull. The preoutfit- 
ted subassemblies were then joined 
with others to form assemblies, 
which were welded together to form 
completed hull modules. Major 
machinery items, such as main 
propulsion equipment, generators 
and electrical panels, were then 
installed during the modular 
assembly period. 

LHD 1 was built in four hull 
modules and one superstructure 
module which were joined together 
on land to form the completed ship's 
hull prior to launch. This early 

Continued 




COL Eugene E. Shoults, 
USMC-Ret. 

Program Manager, Amphibious 
Warfare and Strategic Sealift 
Program (PMS 377) 



CAPT R. Bruce Woodruff 

Supervisor of Shipbuilding 
Conversion and Repair, USN 
Pascagoula, Mississippi 




Gerald J.St. Pe' 

Senior Vice President 
Litton Industries 



Gc 



ferald J. St. Pe' is a corpo- 
rate senior vice president of 
Litton and president of the 
Ingalls Shipbuilding division 
in Pascagoula, Mississippi. 

A native of New Orleans, 
Mr. St. Pe' joined Ingalls in 
1961 in the public relations 
department. He subsequently 
assumed responsibility for 
press relations. 

In 1975 he was named divi- 
sion vice president for indus- 
trial and public relations. In 
1985, he was promoted to 
division president and elected 
a corporate vice president. Mr. 
St. Pe' was elected a senior 
vice president of the corpora- 
tion in 1986. 

Mr. St. Pe ' attended Loyola 
University in New Orleans, 
majoring in journalism. He 
also held a variety of reporting 
and management responsibili- 
ties with newspapers in Louis- 
iana and Mississippi. 

He is a founder and board 
member of the Jackson County 
(Miss.) Economic Development 
District and serves as a mem- 
ber of the Executive Board of 
the Shipbuilders Council of 
America. 



CONSTRUCTION 




outfitting and modular construction 
resulted in a ship nearly 70 percent 
complete when launched on August 
4, 1987. 

That launch was just as innova- 
tive as the ship's construction. LHD 1 
was rolled from her construction 
area to Ingalls' floating drydock for 
launch on a rail transfer system. 
That move— 26,382 tons of ship, 
transfer equipment and associated 
launch cradles — established a new 
world record as the heaviest man- 
made structure ever rolled over 
land. 

The ship's move complete, the 
drydock was positioned over a deep 
water pit, ballasted down so that 
the ship floated free. Following 
launch, LHD 1 was guided to her 
outfitting pier for christening, for 
outfitting and testing in preparation 
for sea trials and delivery. 

When delivered to the Navy on 
May 5, 1989, WASP became the 
fifty-second warship delivered by 
Ingalls since 1975. 




CONSTRUCTION 



LHD 1 begins her 
translation to Ingalls' 
drydock for launch... 




HARD AT WORK ABOARD USS WASP 



Painters Willie Steward, 

left, and Johnny Terrell in 

Engine Room Number One. 



Maintenance Translation 

Supervisor Herman Bass 

"flips the switch," moving 

translation cars under 

Module Three for its 

westward roll in the ship 

integration area. 





Electrician Donna Smith, fore- 
ground, with Electronic Display 
Technicians Mark Weinketz, center, 
and Robert Cottrell in the Combat 
Information Center (CIC). 



Facilities Engineer 

J. A. Fraiser Jr. 

checks drydock 

alignment. 



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Even though she 
wouldn't be 
christened 
"WASP " until 
September, 
Painter Mark 
Mills has already 
given LHD 1 her 
name — on the 
newly installed 
stern gate. 



197 YEARS OF WASP 



S 



CORPION, a merchant schooner 
built at Baltimore, was purchased by 
the Continental Navy late in 1775. 
With HORNET it was the first ship of 
the Navy to go to sea on 14 January 
1776. WASP supported the first am- 
phibious assault, the capture of 
Nassau in the Bahamas in March of 
that year. WASP captured the brig 
BETSY and three other prizes in 
1776. In an unsuccessful engage- 
ment in November 1977, WASP was 
run aground and destroyed in 
Delaware Bay to prevent capture. 




Ti 



he second WASP, a sloop of war 
constructed in 1806 at the Washing- 
ton Navy Yard, was commissioned 
sometime in 1807. WASP's move- 
ments in 1807 and 1808 remain 
unrecorded; but by 1809, she was 
cruising the eastern seaboard of the 
United States. Her single action of 
war came in October 1812. WASP 
and HBM brig FROLIC, a 22-gun 
sloop-of-war, closed to do battle. In a 
short, but sharp fight, both ships 
sustained heavy damage but WASP 
prevailed. Unfortunately for the 
gallant little ship, a British 74-gun 
ship-of-the-line, POICTIERS, 
appeared on the scene, and 



frolic's captor became the final 
prize of the action. WASP served 
briefly in the Royal Navy as PEA- 
COCK but was lost off the Virginia 
capes in 1813. 




X he third WASP, a schooner built 
in 1810 at Baltimore, Md. Her 
owners sold her to a group of busi- 
nessmen who outfitted and armed 
her with a long 9-pounder and then 
chartered 
her to the 
U.S. Navy 
as a 

dispatch 
boat 

during the 
summer of 
1813. On 
1 October 
1813, she 
was sold 
at auction 
at Balti- 
more. 



X he fourth WASP, a sloop char- 
tered on Lake Champlain late in the 
summer of 1813. WASP saw no 
combat. She was returned to her 
owners early in 1814 and her bat- 
tery was transferred. 

i he fifth WASP, a ship-rigged 
sloop-of-war carried twenty 32 
pound cannonades. Commissioned 
in 1814, WASP captured her first 
prize on 2 June. After three more 
prizes WASP engaged the British 
sloop of war REINDEER. After 
trading fire for 19 minutes, WASP 
prevailed and boarded the REIN- 
DEER. In September 1814 WASP 
attacked the brig AVON, but was 
driven away by two larger British 
ships. AVON later sank. WASP 
would eventually capture eight 
more ships before disappearing in a 
storm in October 1814. 



El 



(MMA HENRY, an iron-hulled 
side-wheel steamer, was captured at 
sea in December of 1864. On 13 
June 1865, while undergoing 
repairs, she was renamed WASP. 
Her duty consisted of transporting 
diplomats and generally watching 
out for American interests. She 
continued to be so employed until 




1775 - 1989 



surveyed early in 1876. Decommis- 
sioned that same spring, WASP was 
sold on 5 June 1876. 



C, 



'OLUMBIA, a steam yacht built 
in 1898, was acquired by the Navy, 
renamed WASP, and was commis- 
sioned 11 April 1898. WASP sup- 
ported a landing near Cabanas, 
Cuba the first landing of American 
troops in Cuba in the Spanish 
American War on 12 May 1899. On 
21 July WASP engaged the Spanish 
cruiser DON JORGE JUAN, and 





rine 1-19, churned inexorably closer. 
Two torpedoes smacked home in 
quick succession followed by a third 
while a fourth passed ahead. Both 
hit in the vicinity of gasoline tanks 
and magazines. She sank at 2100 by 
the bow. WASP received two battle 
stars for her World War II service. 



with their other ships, sank the 
cruiser in 58 minutes of firing. After 
the war, WASP served primarily as 
a training ship until 1917 when it 
joined Squadron 8, Patrol Force, 
steaming off Long Island. Finally it 
was decommissioned in 1919. 

1 he eighth WASP (CV-7) was com- 
missioned on 25 April 1940. In early 
1942, WASP participated in the re- 
inforcement of Malta, delivering 
British Spitfire aircraft to that be- 
leaguered island fortress. In June of 
that same year, WASP and her 
escorts transited the Panama Canal 
and became TF 18. At 1445, on the 
15th of September, a lookout called 
out, "three torpedoes... three points 
forward of the starboard beam!" A 
spread of four torpedoes, fired from 
the tubes of the Japanese subma- 




197 YEARS OF WASP 




'I ^ 












"i^n!'?S'i 




L he WASP burned for over five 
hours after three torpedoes struck 
the ship. Since the illumination of 
the burning WASP could disclose 
the location of other American ships 
in the area, the USS LANSDOWNE 
delivered the coup de grace and the 
WASP sank to her ocean grave at 
2100, 15 September 1942. 



1775 - 1989 



M9 



▲ Ni 




NORTH 

CAROLINA 

(BB-55) 



O'BRIEN 
(DD-415) 



TORPEDOING 
CHART 



1. Estimated position of Japanese 
1-19 submarine; firing time: 
1445. 

2. Carrier WASP struck on star- 
board side by three torpedoes. 

3. Crewmen on the U.S.S. HE- 
LENA witness the wake of a 
torpedo, estimated at a course of 
060 \ 



A watch on the U.S.S. LANS- 
DOWNE spotted the wake of a 
torpedo directly under the ship. 
U.S.S. O'BRIEN struck by fifth 
torpedo. 

U.S.S. NORTH CAROLINA hit 
by the same torpedo that missed 
the LANSDOWNE. 



HISTORY OF CVS-18 




i he ninth WASP (CV-18) was laid 
down as ORISKANY on 18 March 
1942 at Quincy, Massachusetts, by 
the Bethlehem Steel Company; 
renamed WASP in November 1942; 
the ship was launched on 17 August 
1942. USS WASP CV-18 was 
commissioned on 24 November 
1942, Captain Clifton A. F. Sprague 
commanding. 

After fitting out and training 
exercises, WASP entered Pacific 
water. In June, 1944, WASP aircraft 
provided close air support for 
amphibious landings on Saipan. 
Starting on the 20th of June, WASP 
participated in the "Great Marianas 
Turkey Shoot," destroying Japanese 
naval air power. 

WASP continued service in the 
Pacific theater, participating with 
fast carrier task forces. Strikes 
against Iwo Jima, the Philippines, 
Okinawa, Formosa and support for 
amphibious landings at Lej^e were 
some of the combat actions in the 
remainder of 1944. 

On 16 February 1945, WASP 
fliers bombed targets near Tokyo 
and then returned to support the 
invasion of Iwo Jima. Aircraft from 
WASP assisted the Marines ashore 
before returning to attack targets in 
the Japanese Islands. In the seven 
days from 17 to 23 March, WASP 



accounted for fourteen enemy 
planes in the air, destroyed six 
more on the ground and scored hits 
on two aircraft carriers, two battle- 
ships and a large cargo ship. 

WASP ended the war attacking 
Japanese Island targets and was 
used as a troop transport until 
1947. In 1948, the ship was con- 
verted to fly jet aircraft. In April, 
1952, WASP collided with destroyer 
minesweeper HOBSON (DD-464), 
tearing a 75-foot sawtooth rip in the 
hull. The damage was repaired by 
fitting the bow of HORNET (CV- 
12), also under repair, to the for- 
ward part of WASP. 

From 1953 to 1955, WASP 
operated in the Pacific before 
receiving an angled flight deck. 
WASP continued to operate in the 
Pacific furing 1956 before returning 
to the East coast as an anti-subma- 
rine carrier, CVS-18. In 1958, 
WASP supported Marine landings 
in Lebanon and, in 1962, was part 
of the Cuban blockade. 

In addition to being the center- 
piece for anti-submarine defense 
groups in these years, WASP also 
became a mainstay of the early 
space program. WASP served as the 
recovery ship for the Gemini space- 
crafts — Gemini IV, Major James 
White and Major Edward McDivitt; 



HISTORY OF CVS-18 



Gemini VI, Captain Walter Schira 
and Major Thomas Stafford; Gemini 
VII, Lieutenant Colonel Frank 
Borman and Commander James 
Lovell; Gemini IX, Lieutenant 
Colonel Thomas Stafford and 
Lieutenant Commander Eugene 
Cernan; and Gemini XII, Captain 
James Lovell and Major Cawin 
Aldrin. Gemini XII, in fact, landed 
within three miles of WASP. 
In the late 1960s, WASP contin- 



ued her anti-submarine role partici- 
pating in a number of exercises in 
the Atlantic and Mediterranean and 
as part of NATO. 

On 1 March 1972, it was an- 
nounced that WASP (CVS-18) would 
be decommissioned and on 1 July 
1972, the last WASP was stricken 
from the Navy list. 

WASP earned eight battle stars 
for her World War II service. 




MISSION 




LCAC 



^'. 


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AV-8B 



CH-46E 



B, 



►y design, amphibious operations 
exploit the element of surprise and 
concentrate balanced forces at 
selected weak points to achieve a 
beachhead on the enemy's shore. 

The capability to conduct success- 
ful tactical air and amphibious 
operations in the objective area is 
only possible with ships that have 
been specifically designed for the 



mission. WASP gives the embarked 
Marine Expeditionary Unit the 
capability to perform its mission 
anjrwhere at anytime. The ability to 
conduct both helicopter and AV-8 
operations while also conducting 
LCAC operations from a well deck 
makes WASP unique to the am- 
phibious fleet. 



COMMANDING OFFICER 



C 



'aptain Leonard F. Picotte, born 
in Calumet, Michigan, enlisted in 
the Navy in 1957 and served on the 
USS SARSFIELD (DD 837). He 
gi'aduated from Northern Michigan 
University in June 1963 with a 
Bachelor of Science Degree in 
Economics and following the OCS 
Program at Newport, R.I., he 
received his commission the same 
year. He served on board the USS 
HORNET (CVS 12) as Explosive 
Ordnance Disposal Officer and 
Gunnery Officer, and then aboard 
the USS HAMMERBURG (DE 
1015) as Main Propulsion Assistant. 
In June of 1967 he attended Naval 
Destroyer School at Newport before 
serving as Weapons Officer of USS 
PRICHETT{DD561). 

From 1969-1971, Captain Picotte 
was assigned as Assistant Cruiser/ 
Destroyer Placement Officer with 
the Bureau of Naval Personnel. He 
then assumed command of USS 
MARATHON (PG 89) and operated 
with River Division 115 in Vietnam. 
Following this tour, he attended 
San Diego State University obtain- 
ing an MA in political science in 
June 1975. He subsequently gradu- 
ated from Armed Force Staff Col- 
lege, Norfolk, Va. 

Returning to sea duty. Captain 
Picotte served as Executive Officer 
of USS POINT DEFIANCE (LSD 
31). From 1978-1980, he was 
Executive Officer and then Officer 
in Charge of Surface Warfare 
Officers' School in Coronado, Calif. 
After his tour at SWOS, he served 
for six months as Executive Officer, 
Naval Station, San Diego, before 
reporting to USS ALAMO (LSD 33) 




for duty in June 1980 as Command- 
ing Officer. He completed that tour 
in June 1982 and returned to 
Bureau of Naval Personnel in 
Washington, D.C., for duty as the 
Surface Warfare Commander 
Detailer. He then attended the 
Naval War College, Senior Course 
in Newport, R.I. from which he 
graduated in June 1985. 

Captain Picotte's next assignment 
was Commanding Officer, USS 



DULUTH (LPD 6) until February 
1988. 

Captain Picotte's decorations and 
awards include the Legion of Merit, 
Meritorious Service Medal, Navy 
Commendation Medal, Combat 
Action Ribbon and Meritorious Unit 
Commendation. 

Captain Picotte and his wife, 
Sandra Whiteley Picotte, of 
Pawtucket, R.I., reside in Norfolk, 
Virginia. 



EXECUTIVE OFFICER 




B 



orn in Lakewood, Ohio, Captain Keith H. 
Larson is a graduate of Heidelberg College, 
Tiffin, Ohio, and was commissioned an ensign 
upon completion of Officers' Candidate School 
(OCS), Newport, R.I., in June 1967. 



Initial sea tours included duty 
aboard USS THADDEUS 
PARKER (DE 369) and USS 
THOMAS J. GARY (DER 326). 
After completing the Navy 
Destroyer School, Department 
Head Course, he reported to the 
Pre-Commissioning crew of USS 
BOWEN (FF 1079) as Weapons 
Officer where he remained until 
April 1973. 

He then returned to the 
Navy's renamed Surface War- 
fare Officers' School (SWOS) 
where he taught department 
heads and Prospective Com- 
manding Officer/Prospective 
Executive Officer students. 
Following this assignment, he 
attended the Naval War Col- 
lege, Command Staff Course, 
from which he graduated in 
June 1976. 

Subsequent sea tours have 
included Assistant Surface 
Operations and Material Officer 
for Cruiser Destroyer Group 12, 



Executive Officer, USS LAW- 
RENCE (DDG 4), and Com- 
manding Officer, USS GAL- 
LERY (FFG 26). Captain 
Larson reported to the Pre- 
Commissioning crew USS 
WASP ( LHD 1 ) as Executive 
Officer in July 1988. 

In shore duty billets, he has 
served as Executive Officer, 
Naval Recuiting District, 
Peoria, 111., and on the staff of 
the Chief of Naval Opera- 
tions, Tactical Readiness 
Division (OP 953E). 

His decorations include the 
Meritorious Service Medal, 
Navy Commendation Medal 
(with gold star in lieu of 
second award) and the Navy 
Achievement Medal. 

Captain Larson is married 
to the former Judith Ann 
Conger, of Lexington, Tennes- 
see The Larsons have one son 
and reside in Virginia Beach, 
Virginia. 



COMMAND MASTER CHIEF 




H 



LTCM(SW) Jorge A. Lopez, 
was born and raised in Laredo, 
Texas. He is a graduate of 
Martin High School and entered 
the Navy in July 1962. 

Initial sea tours included duty 
aboard USS ELKHORN (AOG 
7), USS MARS (AFS 1), and 
RIVERENE Force Vietnam. He 
then went to recruiting duty at 
Naval Recruiting District 
Albuquerque, N. M. USS 
JASON (AR 8), Staff Damage 
Control, Commander, Naval Air 
Force, Pacific and USS DU- 
LUTH (LPD 6). His decorations 
include the Meritorious Service 
Medal, Navy Achievement 
Medal (with three gold stars), 



Combat Action Ribbon, Meri- 
torious Unit Commendation 
Ribbon, Armed Forces Expe- 
ditionary Medal, Good Con- 
duct Medal (6th), Vietnam 
Service Medal, National 
Defense Service Medal, 
Humanitarian Service Award, 
Sea Service Deployment 
Ribbon, Vietnam Meritorious 
Service. 

Master Chief Lopez is 
married to the former Etsuko 
Nakyama, of Nagasaki, 
Japan. The Lopez's have a 
son and a daughter and 
reside in Chula Vista, Califor- 
nia. 



DEPARTMENT HEADS 





CDR Edward A. Banek 
AIMD 



CDR Ludvig K. Tande 
AIR 






CAPT John R. Smith 
COMBAT CARGO 



LT Carl S. Barbour 
COMBAT SYSTEMS 



LCDR Richard A. Lodge 
CHAPLAIN 




LT James W. Grubbs 
COMMUNICATIONS 



LT Eugene M. Mitchell 
1st LT DECK 





LT Kevin L. Weber 
DENTAL 



CDR James H. Hanson 
ENGINEERING 






LTJG Dwayne A. Vanderwall 
EXECUTIVE 



LT Robert A. Whisnant 
MEDICAL 



LCDR Paul Viscovich, Jr. 
NAVIGATION 






CDR Kendall J. King 
OPERATIONS 



LT Robert E. Lucas 
SAFETY 



CDR James W. Hargrove 
SUPPLY 



SHIP'S OFFICERS 




ENS Andy W. Frazier 

AIMD 

Assistant AIMD Officer 




LT Edward E. Mills 
AIR 

Aviation Fuels Officer 




LT John I. Shannon 
COMBAT SYSTEMS 
Ordnance Officer 




CW02 Donald McClellon 

AIMD 

AC Material Officer 




LT Walter E. Schumann 

AIR 

Hanger Deck Officer 




^ 






LTJG James A. Williams 
COMBAT SYSTEMS 
Assistant Combat 
Systems Officer 





LCDR Ronald B. Luhmann 
AIR 

Assistant Air Officer 




LT James Seaborn 

AIR 

Flight Deck Officer 




ENS Andy C. Garlington 
COMBAT SYSTEMS 
Electronic Warfare 
Officer 



LT Barry F. Dagnall 

AIR 

Aircraft Handling 

Officer 




CW02 John Henry B. 

Mireles 
AIR 
A/C Handling Officer 




CW04 William M. Johnson 
COMBAT SYSTEMS 
Weapons Officer 







CAPT Donald F. 

Biedermann, Jr. 
COMMUNICATIONS 
MTCCS Officer in Charge 



ENS Thomas G. Halvorson 
COMMUNICATIONS 
Signals Division Officer 



ENS Glen N. Scott 
COMMUNICATIONS 
Radio Communications 
Officer 



ENS Douglas L. Sickler 
COMMUNICATIONS 
Message Center Division 
Officer 







LT Marshal Weathers 

DECK 

Assistant Deck Officer 



ENS Joscelyn E. Smith 

DECK 

First Division Officer 



CW03 Charles E. 

Watzlavick 
DECK 
Ship's BOSN 



LCDR Richard E. Chamblee 

ENGINEERING 

DCA 







LT Thomas J. Malone 

ENGINEERING 

MPA 



LT Michael H. Stewart 
ENGINEERING 
Electrical Officer 



LTJG Michael F. O'Connell 
ENGINEERING 
Auxiliary Officer 



ENS Bruce D. Caspers 
ENGINEERING 
Assistant DCA 



SHIP'S OFFICERS 




ENS Lary M. Jutras 
ENGINEERING 
Engineering Admin. 
Officer 




ENS Stephen C. Pearson 

ENGINEERING 

E Division Officer 




ENS Kevin M. Prior 
ENGINEERING 
A Division Officer 




ENS Donald A. Sewell 

ENGINEERING 

Main Propulsion Officer 




ENS Desmond N. Smith 

ENGINEERING 

R Division Officer 




ENS James K. Aplin^ 
EXECUTIVE 
Security Officer 




LT Benjamin G. Peril 

MEDICAL 

Medical Admin. Officer 




MAJ Kevin P. Janowsky 

OPERATIONS 

Air Operations Officer 




LCDR James F. Ball 
OPERATIONS 
Intelligence Officer 




LCDR Robert T. Soper 
OPERATIONS 
Electronic Material 
Officer 




LT Edwin F. Williamson 
OPERATIONS 
Special Signals Officer 




LT Edmond M. Frost 
OPERATIONS 
Oceanographic Officer 




LT Matthew Sturges 
OPERATIONS 
HDC Officer 





LT Scott M. Carlson 
OPERATIONS 
CIC Officer 




LCDR Paul D. Workman 

SUPPLY 

Assistant Supply Officer 



LT Frank A. Lindell 

SUPPLY 

Stock Control Officer 




ENS James P. Steil 
OPERATIONS 
Assistant CIC Officer 




LT Charles H. Meyer 

SUPPLY 

Sales Officer 




CW04 Kenneth W. Fabian 
OPERATIONS 
Assistant Intelligence 
Officer 




ENS Keith Anderson 
SUPPLY 
Wardroom Officer 




ENS Peter S. Black 
SUPPLY 
Disbursing Officer 




ENS Craig A. Henderson 

SUPPLY 

Food Service Officer 




CW02 John R. 

Buddenhagen 
SUPPLY 
Data Processing Officer 




Commanding Officer's Remarks 
Captain Leonard F. Picotte, USN 



nediction 

;r Richard A. Lodge, CH, USN 
Chaplain, USS WASP (LHD 1) . 



Departure of Official Party 



General Visiting 



ADMINISTRATION DIVISION • EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT 



Front Row, L-R 

HTCM (SW) Jorge A. Lopez 

LCN John W. Murray 

NCCS (SW) Bruce W. Cobb 

YNC James E. Greathouse 

PNCM(SW) Charles LCIaybourn 



Front Row. L-R 

RP1 David Trejo 

PCSR Alan Puzio 

YN3 Robert M. Edens 

PC2 Larry D. Simmons 

LM Walton B. Westerfield 

Back Row, L-R 

SR Williams 

JOSN Michael J. Buckingham 

J01 Jerry Foster 

RP3 Tony L. Mar 

PCSA Thomas J. Raff erty 



Front Row. L-R 

PN2 Torrence M. Lamb 

PNSA Paul A. Trujillo 

PNSN Jackson 

YNSA Scott C. Neumann 

PN1 (AW) Issacc Knox 

Back Row. L-R 

MA2 Richart T. Andreyo 

MAI Vern Bergeson 

NC1 (AW) David Sanders 

PNSR Juan Floras 




NAVIGATION DEPARTMENT • navigation division 




QMC (SW) William W. Hinds 



1 


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Fronf Row. L-R 
QMSA Rodrigues 
QM3Quinn 
QUSN Ouzts 


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Back Row. L-R 
QM2 (SW) Bryant C. Brookins 
QM1 (SW) Dexter Walker 
QMSA Ramone K. Lee 
QM2 (SW) Wayne J. Haws 


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MEDICAL / DENTAL DEPARTMENTS 



L-R 

HMC James W. McGuire 

HMCS (SW) Charles T. Price 



L-R 

DTI William A. Mann 

DA James H. Williams 

DTI Neil C. Fillingim 






1 


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Front Row, L-R 


HN Douglas A. Brian 


^_^ 




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HM3 John Delacruz 










Hv^y 


HM3 William N. Wolfinger 


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HM3 Ralph L. Willoughby 


^^^^^H 










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HM3 Adam N, Casborn 


^^^^^K 










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HM3 John V. Verdidiano 


^^^^H 










^I^H 


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Back Row, L-R 


^^^^H 










^H^l 


^^^1 


HM3 Rowland K. Owens 


^^^^^H 






Q^V^^^^^^^^I 




^H^B| 


^^^H 


HM2 Darrell D. Trumbule 


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HM2 Eugene A. Squicciarini 


mr- ^^^1 










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HM1 Karl T. Kelly 


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^^^H 


HM3 Terrance Anderson 


^^^^H 










^^^^ 


^^^ 


HM3 Roland D. Schilling 

















COMMUNICATIONS DEPARTMENT • cr/cs divisions 




L-R 

SMC Millard A. Thompson 
RMC Richard D. Rose 
GYSGT Michael E, McKinney 
RMCM Peter P. Cartell 



Front Row. L-R 
RMSA Preston P. May 
RMSA Carey R. Johnson 
RM1 Bruce R. LaFave 

Back Row. L-R 
RM1 Ronnie J. Puryear 
RM3JohnG. Gurr 
RMSR Steven E. Smith 
RMSA Tommie Cleckley Jr. 









1 ■♦ 






Fronf Row. L-R 
SM2 EricT. Jackson 




^^^^^H^Hjj^^jj^l 


I^^^H^jH^^^^Bfl 


L ^ 


SM3 John D. Yanik 


M 


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SMSA Daniel J. Kotula 
SMSChnstopherJ, Yanik 
SMI Perry J. Gordon 

Back Row. L-R 


iL_lJl^^| 


^^^^^^^^^^^E^ 


i^^^^^^mi^^^^^^ 


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SMSA Steven G. Brainerd 


II^^^^^P 


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^^^^^^^^^^^L ^ V^^^^^^^^^^K. 


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SMSA Malcolm F. King 


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1 


1 


SMSA William C. Henley 
SMSA Joseph A. Neiser 
SMSA Bnan K. Gardner 
SMSA Martin E. McDonough 



CM DIVISION . COMMUNICATIONS DEPARTMENT 





^^f 1 


/ 


^^ 


„, 


Front Row, L-R 
RMSA Ceroid D. Wilson 


%/^ 




^^^^^^^Hk^ ^^^B^^^ 


^^L. 


RMSN Philip W.Faulkner 




M^^^^H^^H 


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RMSATimmyJ. Mitchell 


^^T^^^^H^^^^R 


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RMSA Dernck L, Luzader 


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Back Row. L-R 


^^^I^^^^^H 




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RMSN Roland A. Lane 


H^^^^^^^^^^H 




^ TT^f . M^^^^^^^H 




RMSA Michael Clay 


I^^^^^^^^^^H 






^Biii^M 


RMSN Shawn L. Smith 


^^^^^^l^^^^^^l 






^^^P^ll 


RMSA Todd J. Sladek 


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^^1 


H 



Fronf floiv, L-R 

RM1 James R. Vance 

RM1 Sidney Wright 

RM2 Adelardo Fragoso 

RM3 Raymond Cunnikin 

Back Row, L-R 

RMS Henry E. Farmer 

RM1 Robert B. Hams 

RM3 Darrell E. Brown 

RM3 Kelvin A. Hann 

RM3 Bret 0. Henderson 




OPERATIONS DEPARTMENT • OA/oc divisions 




Front Row.L-R 
ETCS (SW) Joseph L. Hart 
CTOC (AW/NAC) Donald F. 
Pagliaro 
AGC John A. Yetsko 
ISC (SW) Raymond A. Borah 

Back Row. L-R 
ETC Robert M. Wolke 
OSC Dale B. Dewar 
ETC George B. Hudson 
OSCS Albert M. Greene 
ETC (SW) Michael A. Boynton 



L-R 

AGAN Bradley B. Harper 
AGAN Dean C. Jablonski 
AG1 Fredrick Reynolds 
AG1 Wayne D. Edwards 
AGS Michael H. Messersmith 



L-R 

ACAN Michael A. Ciavattone 
AC2 Robert T. Williams 
ACAA Stevens S. Shropshire 
AC1 (SW) Rick A. Stein 
AC2 David W. Leaser 
ACAN Grischa M. Denmark 



OE DIVISION . OPERATIONS DEPARTMENT 



Front Row. L-R 

ET1 Michael D. Wade 

ET1 James D. Duncan 

ET3 Joseph A. Kasperowski 

ET3 William C. Martin 

ET3 Tomas Santiago 

ET3 Ralph A, Haney 

Back Row. L-R 

ET3 Paul J. Gandee 

ET3 Michael D. McMillan 

ET3 Denny L. Pinter 

ET3 Daniel Hutchinson 

ET3 Scott A. Housel 



Front Row. L-R 

ET3 Sylvester J. Maxie 

ET2 Felipe Guadalupe 

ET3 Steve D. Cornish 

ET3 Neal F. Henk 

ET3MarkJ. Solland 

Back Row. L-R 

ET3 Daniel L. Swindler 

ET3John A. Novitsky 

ET2 Donald E. Reed 

ET3 Joseph A. Patt 

ET2 Joseph L. Patrick 



L-R 
ET3 William L. Steelsmith 
ET3 Thomas E. Lawrence 




OPERATIONS DEPARTMENT • oi division 



Ji 


It '■ "^lJBI 


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Front Row, L-R 
OSSR Todd J. Robbins 


dki 


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I^^M^i ' ^H| 




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OSSA Andre J. Clark 


m^ 


^^^B K,^^^^B^^|^^^t 


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11 


OSSR Paul R. Addington 
OSSA Joseph W. Andress 
0S2 (SW) Mitchell M. Felipe 

Back Row. L-R 


J 


■^ai 


IP^I 




^H 


0S1 Benny M. Anderson 
0S3 Roland Gutierrez 
0S3 Laveone W. Barrnett 




V^^R^^^EH 


^^^^^^^^^^M ' '"'^^^^^^^^r^^^l 




H^^^^^p^^ 


OSSA Charles J. Conners 


UH 


IK^H 






^^u«. 


0S2 Roland S. Winstead 




Front Row. L-R 
OSSN Angel L. Checo 
OSSN George W. Grandstaft 
0S2 Patrick J. Hodgson 
0S2 Kim M. Simmons 
0S1 John D. Poor 

Back Row, L-R 
OSSA Terrence Lopez 
OSSA William P. Boldin 
OSSA James W. Martin 
OSSA Brad M. Averett 
OSSR Frank A. Armstrong 



Front Row. L-R 
OSSA Daniel Fayard 
0S3 Randall J. Wilson 
OSSN Bnan J. Goldsmith 
OSSR Greg Wheeler 
OSSR Miguel A. Diaz 

Back Row. L-R 
OSS Donald L. Baker 
OSSN Peter L. Kretowicz 
0S1 Ricky J. Roberts 
0S1 Gary M. Parker 
0S3 Robert A. Cooper 



OS DIVISION . OPERATIONS DEPARTMENT 



Front Row. L-R 

CTM2 Timothy N. Sullivan 

CTOSN James W. Meeks 

CTOl Daniel S. Sites 

CT02 Douglas M. Main 

Back Row. L-R 

CT02 James H.Michael 

CT03 Rinaldo W. Clark 

CTM3 Robert McDuffie 

CTR1 Alfred W. Littlejohn 















i^*^ -« ^m 




A, 



X 





OPERATIONS DEPARTMENT • oz division 




L-R 

PHAN Marshall B. Borgen 
PHI James E, Westfall 
PHI Michael S. Harrison 
PHAA Jerry A. McKinney 
PHAA Ricky W. West 



Front Row. L-R 

IS3 Corrigan 

IS2 (SW) Craig L. Gilchnst 

ISSN Charles B. Sowell 

IS2 Christopher Hurst 

IS1 Dale P. Wright 

Back Row, L-R 
ISSA Sean F, O'Conner 
ISSN Chns M. Taylor 
ISSA David A. Olson 
ISl Edward M. Bender 
ISSN Donald L. Moore 







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Front Row. L-R 


^ 1 


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DPSA Joseph H.Hoechst 
DP2 Starr G.Deuel 


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DPSA Nadine T. Betts 


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DM1 Norman R. Hermoso 

Back Row. L-R 

DPSR Jonathan D. Norris 


B^Jy • ,-;'■' 


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DP2 Alfred J. Roessler 
DPI Peter E. Muller 
EP1 Peter J. Steinberg 
DPSR John E. Jacques 



FIRST DIVISION • DECK DEPARTMENT 





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L-R 


BMC (SW) Leroy A. Dunn 




P^ n:*W 




BMC (SW) Brian T. Rhodes 




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■ 


1 



Fronf Row. L-R 

BM1 (SW) Richard A. Marks 

SA David G. Ford 

SR Evans V. Wood 

SA Troy S. Brown 

SA Stanley M. Steele 

Back Row. L-R 

SA Michael J. Sobieraj 

SA David McMath 

SA David W. Andrews 

SR Donnie L. Scogin 

BM3 Allen C. Clark 




DECK DEPARTMENT • first division 



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Fronf floiv. /.-fl 




W D' 


BM2 Raff L. Roundtree 
SA Grover A. Huff 
SR Brown 


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BM3 Jeffery N. Schmitt 

Back Row. L-R 

SN Robert J. Cavalier 

SA Mark E. Harrell 


"% 


/ 1 


SA Anderson 


I Mi' ^ ^ •^ 


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BM2 Elvis Buckhalter 





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SA Richard Wright 
SA Thomas 


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SA Tony E. Banks 
BM2 Jeffrey S. Edwards 
SA Jerry B. PlentI 

Back Row. L-R 

SA Keith A. Chambers 

BM3 Keith B. Pegues 


I^^^^^^^H 




kJ^KiI 


IQ 




SA Terry W. Griffin 
BM2 Robert R. Foster 
SR Michael H. Johnson 



SECOND DIVISION • DECK DEPARTMENT 



Front Row. L-R 

SR Henery M. Harris 

SA Gregory R. Delvecchio 

SN Corey S. Gillespie 

SA Travis C. Scott 

SA Todd D. Connor 

Back Row, L-R 

SA Adel Villarreal 

SA Antonio D. Britton 

SA Michael D. Wilcox 

SR Randall A. Scobie 

SR William A. Oliver 



Front Row, L-R 

BM2 David G. McWatters 

BM2 Victor V. Lugo 

BMSN Hershell T. Cross 

SA Phillip R, Hodges 

BM3 Craig B. McLeroy 

SR Michael B. Lee 

Back Row, L-R 

BM3 Charles E. Copley 

BM2 Gregory Velez 

SA Michael E. Landrum 

BM2 Theodore W. Gricks 

SR Kevin D. Hennix 












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Front Row, L-R 


H" lf^— T^^^ 


lilP^^^P^ 




I'^^BH 


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SA Ivy P. Speight 


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^^1 


SN Keith A. McKiver 


i^^^H^^P 


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^^^Hfli 


^^H .^^H 


^^H 


SR Brian K. Worthy 


■J^B^^^H 


^^^^K^^H 




^^^^1 


^^^^^1 


r^^l 


SN Robert P. Jones 


fl^^^^^^^^l 


^^^^^^^^H 




^^^^H 


^^^^^H 


S^^l 


SA Clodold L. Beriau 


^^^^^^^M 


^^^^^^1 




^^^H 


^^^^1 


^H 


Back Row, L-R 


^^^^Bl^l 


^^^^^^1 




^^^H 


^^^^1 


^H 


SA Luis A. Aviles 


^^^^^^^i^P 


^^H^^^E 




"^^^^^H 


^^^^^H 


^^H 


SA Thomas 


^^^^^H^^F 


^^^Irfl^l 




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^^^^^H 


l^^l 


SA Quinton T. Neal 


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^^^E^flM^I 




^^^Hv 


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SA Michael L. Davis 


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SA Charles R. Price 


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COMBAT SYSTEMS DEPARTMENT • CD division 




Front Row, L-R 
DSCS (SW) Albert J. Lavin 
AOC (AW) Robert L. 
Schackmuth 
FCCS (SW) Billy L. Seltzer 

Back Row. L-R 
EWC (SW) Russell J. 
Schwickert 
FCC Arthur R. Dan 
FCC Douglas A, Smith 



Front Row. L-R 
DS1 Gary L. Bair 
DS3 Donald A. Lawhead 
DS3 John W.Carls 
DS1 John A, Kotusky 
DC3 Reginal 0. Moreland 

Back Row. L-R 
DS3 Bryan J. Perry 
DS3 Patrick E. Loughridge 
DS3 Kirk B. Payne 
DS1 Kirk A. Snyder 
DS1 John D. Goodell 



Front Row, L-R 
DS3 Michael G. Grove 
DSl Lawrence Desilets 
DSSN Eloy Feliciano 
DS3 Rosario Gambardella 

Back Row. L-R 
DS3 Richard T. Deason 
DS3 Henry N. Wadsworth 
DS3 Ralph E. Wilson 
DS3 Kevin A. Eraser 
DS3 Troy A. Kimble 



CF/CG DIVISIONS • COMBAT SYSTEMS DEPARTMENT 



Front Row, L-R 

FC3 Jon L. Nash 

FC3 Ronnie D. Whaley 

FC3 Cliff T, Lincoln 

FC3 Donald C. Murray 

FC3 Londis Carpenter 

Back Row. L-R 

FC2 George C. Kock 

FC1 Mark D. Headen 

FC3 Benjamin J. Armstrong 

FC1 Jon L. Schlegel 

FC3 Philip D. Lilly 



Front Row, L-R 

FC3 Timothy D. Clark 

FC2 (AW) Larry R. Daugherty 

FC2 Paul J. Olivares 

FC3 Daniel P. Alexander 

Back Row, L-R 

FC3 Gregory W. Ray 

FC3 Steven E. Short 

FC3 Robert B. Young 

FC1 Elwell Weatherhead 

FC3 Clint E. Dorminey 








S v**v 


i 






1 




Front Row, L-R 

GMG1 Linw^ood J. Page 

AOAR Todd S. Marsaiek 

AOAA Malcom L. Hands 

A01 David F. Gore 

AOAA Chad A. Hunt 


Back Row, L-R 

A02 Henry Lapo Jr. 

A02 Benigno Pena 

A03 Joel B. Taylor 

AOAR Phillip L. Rockenbaugh 

AOAN Tommy Gilbert 




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COMBAT SYSTEMS DEPARTMENT • CG / ci divisions 











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1 




Fran/ Row. L-R 
AOAA Felipe Trejo 
AOAN Johnny L. Stevenson 
AOAN Michael L. Marchang 
GMGSA Willie McLoyd III 




^^^^^Ej^^H 


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■ 


■ 


Back Row. L-R 


^L ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^1 


^^■f V si^^^^^^^^H ^^^Li 


1 




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1 


A02 (AW) Johnny C. Caddell 
A01 (AW) Michael E, Kolbek 
AGAR Kelly J. Bohlen 
GMC3 Donald R. Palmer 




Front Row. L-R 
EW3 Richard N, Ferreira 
EW3 Robert A. Johnson 
EW3 William C. Wise 
EW3 James Vadino 

Back Row. L-R 
EW3 Brian W. Andrews 
EW2 John R. Brewster 
EW3 Richard W. Conrad 
EW3 John C. Kowalski 



v-1 DIVISION . AIR DEPARTMENT 



L-R 

ABFCS (AW) Reinhardt K. Martin 

ABCS (AW) Dobbs B. Dennis 

ABHC Michael P. McGeary 



Front Row, L-R 

ABH3 Charles Maldonado 

ABHAARoger J. Robinson 

ABHAA Jimmy J.Olson 

AR Benjamin Gomez Jr. 

ABH1 James G. Proffitt 

Back Row, L-R 

ABH2 (AW) Dayl C. Carlson Jr. 

AN Dwayne M. Collins 

ABH1 Marvin G. Palmer 

AA Shawn C. Esser 

ABH2 Sylvester Robinson Jr. 

AR Mark I. Jones 



Front Row, L-R 

AR JefferyJ. Davids 

AR Michael A. Ness 

AR Mark A. Stover 

AR Michael J. LeVay 

ABHAN Craig L. Randle 

Back Row, L-R 

AR Davis V. Pressel 

AA Thomas R. Bolman 

ABHAA Charles R. Little Jr. 

AR Allen L. Moorehead 

AR Christopher Mullaney 




AIR DEPARTMENT • v-i / v-2 divisions 




Front Row. L-R 
ABHAN Scott T. Muncer 
AA Dracy Peacock 
AAJoel R. Ingold 
AA Tommy D. Goldston 
AA Jeffrey D. Anger 

Back Row. L-R 
AR Paul E. Evans 
ABHAA Michael E. Oldham 
ABHAA Ronnie P. Drury 
AR Marshall R. Miller 
ABHAN James J. Miller 
ABHAN Darren Monroe 
ABH3 Ricardo C. Kiner 




Front Row. L-R 
AR Robert E. Hatchings 
ABHAR Aulama Lemalu 
AA Sean H. Uythoven 
AA Adrain T. Gilford 

Back Row. L-R 
ABHAN Jimmy P. Sturdivant 
AA James E. Keefe 
ABHAA Michael D. Peaslee 
ABH3 Thaddeus L. Smith 





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k. 


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Front Row, L-R 


^^B^ ^t^^L ^ J^^^^^^HI^^I 




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ABH2 James R.Miller 
AA Dexter T. Thames 
AN Jonathan M. Yovanno 
AA Erbin A. Morales 
AN Bryan S. Thomas 

Back Row, L-R 
ABHAA Kelvin Peterson 
ABHAA Donnie W. Reliford 
AA Jackson 
AA Robert J. Cox 
AA Joseph A. Reis 
ABHAA James E. Robinson 



V-3/V-4 DIVISIONS • AIR DEPARTMENT 



Front Row. L-R 

ABH1 Jose L. Barba 

ABHAA Rodney K. Cox 

AA Daniel J. Peter 

AA Felix C. Johnson III 

AA Alan E. Brooks 

Back Row. L-R 

ABHAA Robert L. Nicholos 

ABHAA Darin J. Weiks 

AR Tyrone M. Washington 

ABHAA Arra McGee 

AA Roderick D. Beasley 






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B 


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Front Row, L-R 


S| JH 1 


^^L. ^^^k^lP 




B^til^ ^l^^icak ^1 


P J^ 


AR Sidney D. Grant 










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ADF3 Kelvin Peters 


j^^fsM 


^^^^K^^^BI 






^^^^H 


AN Christopher S. Short 




I^^^A^^^^W 






i^^^^l 


ABH2 Lawrence E. Adside 




B^^^^^^^^M 






^^^^bV 


ABF2 Jesus C. Lozano 




^^^^^^^H 






i^Hfl 


Back Row. L-R 




^^^^^^^1 






j^^n 


ABFAA Marcus M. Chism 




^H^^^^^^pB 






I^^Hp 


ABFAA William B. Harnson 




^^^^^^^^pl 






V^^H 


ABF3 Michael D. Phillips 




m^^^^^^^H 






« ^^H 


ABF2 Frank A. Puccini 




'^^Pl^^Vt^^ 




K ^^^^^^^^^^^ 


■ ^H 


ABFAA Neal W. White 


*■ 


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... ■ ■ "'v.'^.'.'-'':'r-''-"''^"7 ■ ■*.- 


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Front Row. L-R 

AA Richard L. Chalmers 

ABFAA Richard W. Carlson III 

AA Ronald C. Schellhammer 

ABFAA Anthony K. Elinger 

ABFANAaronJ. HillJr. 

Back Row. L-R 

AA Alexis M. Zorrilla 

AA Chad A. Hunt 

ABF2 Ernest L. Marlow Jr. 

ABF3 Robert A. Stallins 

ABF3 David E. Hall 




SUPPLY DEPARTMENT • si / S2 divisions 




Front Row. L-R 

MSC Marcelo B. Cardenas 

SHGM Johnny E. Love 

Back Row, L-R 
SKC (SW) John M. Bennett 
DFC Douglas A, Dorival 
SKCS (SW) Stanley E. Cantrell 







K|H 




^ 




Front Row. L-R 
SKSR Fred E. James 
SN Reginald K. Clark 










B 


Back Row. L-R 
SKSA Bobby D. Blevins 
SKSA Shawn A. McDaniel 
SK2 Michael Upson 




L i 


^^^■Plr 




:'-*' > 






Front Row. L-R 
MSSN G. M. Hartke 
MSCM B. G. Siagan 
MSSA D. Kelly 
FA B. J. Stackhouse 

Back Row. L-R 
MMSA E. M. Becton 
MMSA S. L. Shrum 
AA D, L. Jackson 
MS3 S. L. Cade 
SA T. E. Wilson 
MSSR S. J. Clark 



S2 / S3 DIVISIONS • SUPPLY DEPARTMENT 





© 


fr 




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Front Row. L-R 


MS2T. B. Dimino 


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MSSA B. S. Butler 
MSSN D. T. Calhoun 




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Back Row. L-R 


H^^l 


^^^^1 




^^^k 


M 


^^^^1 


^^^^ 


^^1^1 


FN R. G. Gonzalez 


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I^^^^B 


l,^^^^H 


^^^H 




m^^^^M 


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^^^H^m 


MSSA M. L. Conyers 

MSSA R. C. Carpernter 

MSSA E. D. Mew 


1 


1 




1 


1 


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1 


1 







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Front Row. L-R 

SHSR Scott P. Holder 

SHSA Reginald L.Crosby Jr. 

SHSA Dennis L. Orth 

SHSR George Burnett 


Back Row. L-R 

SHSR Patrick E. Cox 

SHSR Allen E. Gray 

SHSR Levern Reagins 

SHSR Brian M. Murray 


« 




-I* 


P 


■ 


"^^^^w I 







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1 




Franf Row. L-R 

SHSA Alex Andrew A. Ferrer 

SN Terry Douglas 

SH1 Michael A. Rector 

SHI Diosdada L. Morales 

Back Row. L-R 

SHSA James R.Alfred Jr. 

SHI (SW) Willie L.Evans Jr. 

SH3 Ronald J. Jehning 


SHSA Wayne A. Raney 


51 



SUPPLY DEPARTMENT • S4 / S5 / S6 divisions 




L-R 

DKSA Kelvin L. McCarty 
DK1 Felmd Corpuz 
DK2 James S. Waters 



^ 


! - 


_-•» 

^ 
^ 


\A^f 




1 






Front Row. L-R 
MSI Donald W. Coplien Jr. 
MSS Andrew D. Deen 
MSSA Ronald Dunham. 


m 


1 


1 


B 




1 




Back Row. L-R 
MSSA Shawn A. Kalebaugh 
MSSA Brent Cockerham 
MSSA Victor G. Betts 
MSSA John R. Smith 


^^^^1 


E 




Jl 


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1 







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L-R 

AA Jason C. Cleanthes 


m^ 




AK2 John A. Rhea 






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^^^^m^mmm 


AA Vincent J. Karam 


^^^B i 








^^H 


AK1 Lykourgos Fragoulis 




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^^^P' 


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fll^V ^ 


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S7 / S8 DIVISIONS • SUPPLY DEPARTMENT 









t-^y 






Front Row, L-R 
DPI Joseph M. Bell 


DPI Alvin G.Bates Jr. 


SL ^Hfyfi^^B 


^^■k ^^9 




iS^fl 


DPI Patrick M. Peterson 


^^^^H^Bi 


^^B^^^hpH 


^^^^^HH 






DP3 Bradley E, Stanford 


^^^H^Bj 


^^^^^^H^l 


^^^^^H 




^^I^^H 


DPSN Darrin J. Baldinelli 


^^^^^^1 


^^^^^^^^fl 


^^^^^H 




^^^^^^H 


Back Row. L-R 


^^^^^H 


I^^^H^H 


^^^^^9 




^^^^^H 


DPSN Chad D. Sailer 


^^^^B^l 


^H^H^^^^^I 


^Hm^Hi 


^^^^^^V^^^^^^K\\^^^^^^I 


^^^^^^^1 


DPSA Lance L. Marcum 


^^S^^^H 


^^H^vl^^^^l 


^^^^K^ A^^^^^^H 


^^^K^ v|^^^| 


^PVI^^H 


DPSAJames A. Sanders 


^^LTv^^H 


^^^^^y^^^^H 


^Btoil^^l 






DPSN Michael W. Crane 


^^ki^^^l 


^^l^^^^^^^l 


^^^^^^H 






DPSA William D. Wood 


.^^H 


H^^H 


^^H 




^^^1 



Front Row. L-R 

SK2 Joseph M. Phillips 

SKI Isaac B. Montgomery 

AKAA William M.Thying 

Back Row. L-R 

SKSA Ira R. Buchanan 

SKSA Patrick E. Cox 

AA Robert F. Lavello 




ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT 




Front Row, L-R 

ICC (SW) Gregory Hoffman 

MMC Randy E. Manuel 

Back Row, L-R 
EMCS (SW) Lowell P. Redd 
MMC Alan W. Arringfon 
ENC (SW) Gale E. Furthmiller 



Front Row. L-R 
MMC (SW) James F. Krabiel 
DCC (SW) Robert B. Beyea 
MMC Jon L. Gentry 

Back Row, L-R 
DCCM (SW) Donald E. Porter 
MMCS Rictiard A, Klein 
BTC Thomas J. Schomp 
BTCS (SW) Barry L. Hess 



A DIVISION . ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT 



Front Row, L-R 

FA Dimas D. Arellano 

MM1 William D. Allen 

FR Randy Durant 

FN David L. McLain 

MMFN Richard P. Ward 

Back Row. L-R 

FR Charles E. McCorkhill 

FR Timothy S. Esmeraldo 

MMFA Steven A. Smith 

MM3 Jamie P. House 

Bobby C. Poovey 



Front Row. L-R 

MM3 Edward A, Johnson 

MM3 Mark J. McCoy 

MMFA Timothy L, Joiner 

MM1 William L. Brusven 

MM1 James M. Thomas 

Back Row. L-R 

MM2 Scott G. Brown 

MM3 John H.Ballard 

MM3 George W. Little 

MM2JohnE. SaariJr. 

FA Mark R. Culbertson 






K4 


. 


^B f. -, 1 


'i 






fei 


Front Row. L-R 
EN1 Douglas A. Sherman 


ENFA Terrance R. Poindexter 




JiS^ 




HH 


^^^A^^BIh 


^^^^^^^^^^^^^^K\ ^^^^^m 


^^^^H 


ENFA Dennis T. Woolfolk 




^H 




^^1 


^HHH^^^H 




V^^H 


EN1 (SW) Charles J. English 
EN3 Gary D. Canary 




^^^ 




B 


^^^H 




^H 


Back Row. L-R 




^^Kj 




|H 


^^^^^^^H 




^^H 


EN2 Tommy P. Cline 

EN3 Lorenzo Murphy 

ENFA George A. Bennett 

ENFN Kevin D. Jenkins 


M^^^^^^^^^^l 


P 




1 


^W 




y 


ENFN Paul Vanhorn 


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■■w 


Wff^^Wff™! 


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MM2 Mark S. Swager 








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ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT • a / e divisions 




Front Row, L-R 
MR1 James E. Lowe II 
EM2 Fredrick D. Johnson 
MR2JohnH, McKenneyJr. 
FR Stephen W, Brauer 
MR3 Terry H. Giles 

Back Row, L-R 
MM3 Christopher M. Diamond 
EM2 Mills R. Coursey 
EM1 William H. Shelley 
FA Vernon L. Miller 
MMFN Timothy M. Roberts 



Front Row, L-R 
IC3 Stephen F. Blease 
IC2 Allen H. Alexander 
ICFA Keith W. Heck 
ICFN Spencer Thomas Jr. 

Back Row, L-R 
ICFA Bienvenido Soto 
IC1 Gerard M. McGuire 
IC3 Victor S.Mgeni 





,, 


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ii! 


rB 






H. 

g^^ 




Front Row, L-R 

FA Charles F. Gordon 


fl\l^H 


l^j 


^iit^ 


9^^^^^/ 


^Bb^ 


^^^^■1' 


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IC2 Ronald D. Chapin 


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1 




1 


I 






^^^^^Ki^^ 


ICFA Alton J. Randall 
IC3 Michael Barrera 

Back Row, L-R 
ICFA Michael D. Wise 
IC2 William D.Taylor Jr. 
IC3 Michael R. Semrau 
IC1 Jack W. Smith 



E/ MP OIL LAB DIVISION • ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT 



Front Row, L-R 

EMFN Kenneth R. Sands 

EMFA Patrick W. Tilton 

EM2 Marcus G. Williams 

EM1 (SW) Kenneth D, Alward 

FR Nathan D. Brooks 

Back Row, L-R 

EM2 Julian P. Avila 

EMFA Keith B, Ivey 

EMFA Rodney W. Custer 

EMI Eric H. Williams 

EMFN Lihn D. Mai 



Front Row, L-R 

EMFA James A. Boley Jr. 

EMI Dwight M.Hall 

EM1(SW) William LRidgeway Jr. 

FR Randy J. Phillips 

Back Row, L-R 

EMFN Barry E. Lipscomb 

EMFA Edward J. Donovan Jr. 

EMFN Victor M. Tillman 

EM3 Theodore J. Garrity 

EMFN Arthur H. Richardson III 








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Front Row, L-R 


BT2 Scott E. Gorham 
FA Gerald McDaniel 








BT1 (SW) Donald L. Holt 




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Back Row, L-R 






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FA Michael D. Johnson 






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BT3 Lawrence Jackson Jr. 






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FR Roy D. Livingston 






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ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT • MP forward division 





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Front Row. L-R 
MM3 Douglas A. Brockhaus 
MM3 Jeffery E. Langston 
BTFN Kenneth J, Maxwell 
BT2 Felipe Barajas 






Back Row, L-R 
FA John D, Lamneck 
BTFA James B. Campbell 
FN Steven J. St. Clair 
BTFA Carthel Hill Jr. 




Front Row, L-R 
BT1 Wayne A. Beyer 
BTFN Walter P. Wilson 
BTFA Michael K. Boswell 
MMFA Gerald J. Rodriguez 

Back Row. L-R 
FR Michael J. Thompson 
MM1 (SW) Michael L Lemke 
BT1 (SW) Jeffery T. Ginn 
MM3 Shane F. Tolley 



Front Row, L-R 
MMFA Pablo 0. Dayao 
MM3 Jamie J. Medrano 
BT3 Steven P. Fulton 
BTFN Sherman B.Bibee Jr. 

Back Row, L-R 
FR Gregory R. Woolfolk 
MM2 Jeffery D. Cross 
BTFA Adrian A. Vines 
BTFA Tim D. McCoy 



MP AFT DIVISION • ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT 



Front Row. L-R 

FA Ronald Redmond 

BT1 Walter H.KIeinertz Jr. 

BT2 Lewis R. Gillum 

MM3 Robert A. Evenson 

MMF A Manual O.Chan 

Back Row, L-R 

MMFA Edward E. Watson 

MMFN Michael A. Dillon 

MM2 Gregory A. Reinhardt 

FA Michael C. Greiner 

BTFA Daniel L. Hampton 




Front Row, L-R 

MM3 Brent A. Shafer 

MM3 Dave C. Bonham 

MM2 Kenneth R. Lentz 

BT2 Don S. Tripp 

Back Row, L-R 

Herbert L. Broughton Jr. 

MMFA Ronald Glover 

FR Paul P. Barry 

FA Percy H. Henning 

FR Matthew M. Montana 






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Front Row. L-R 
FR Carl E. Reid Jr. 


MM3 William J. Packard 




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BTFN Romont A. Jones 




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BT2 Jose A. Aguerrebere 


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MM3 Paul Cato 


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BTFN John D. Stuart 














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BTFN Martin A. Szwed 


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ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT • r division 



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Front Row. L-R 
DCFAJohn M. Landers 


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DCFA Leonard E. Beard III 


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FA David C. Bruno 


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Back Row, L-R 


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^^^^^^1 




^^^^^^^H 


HT2 John M. Earnest 


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DC1 MarkA. Reigle 


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DCFA David C. Burke 


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DC2 Robert L. Wentworth 




Front Row, L-R 
DCFA Michael A. Barden 
DCFA David L. Mastin 
DCFA Donald R. Jenkins 
FA William 0. Givens 
DCFA Brian T. Durden 

Back Row. L-R 

FN Willie Beaty Jr. 

HTFA Chnstopher N. Boucher 

DCFA William G.Vetter Jr. 

HT2 Richard G. Schultz 

DCFA Gary K. Westburg 



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Front Row, L-R 

DCFA Frank R. Brown Jr. 

DCFA Joseph B. Sidlauskas 


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FR Morris Akes Jr. 


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^^^^^^^^H 


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FN Joe W.Giles 


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^^^^^^^1 


^^^^^^H 


HTFA Dennis D. Wendt 


^^^1 






^^^^^^^1 


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Back Row. L-R 


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FR Joseph L. Robinson 


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HT1 GaryJ. Sullins 


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DCFA Robert D. Matthews 
HT2 (SW) Michael T. Hunter 
HT2 Fredrick L. Brumbaugh 



COMBAT CARGO DEPARTMENT 



L-R 

MGYSGT Frank J. Zechmeister 

GYSGT Leonard A. Shrauger 

GYSGT Michael A. Ackermann 





SAFETY DEPARTMENT • safety division 




Front Row, L-R 

EM1 (AW) Alexander M. Abrenica 

BM2 Jose Cardona 

Back Row, L-R 
FC1 Jeffery L. Coufal 
AD2 William S. Holloway 
ABH2 (AW) Dayle C. Carlson Jr. 




AVIATION INTERMEDIATE MAINTENANCE DEPARTMENT 

IM-l DIVISION 



L-R 

ATC (AW) Russell K. Rubley 

ASC (AW) David L, Hughes 

AFCM (AW) Neil E. Rouse 

AOCS (AW) Paul N.Schmidt Jr. 














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Front Row, L-R 


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PR1 Cecil E.Nixon Jr. 


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AZ2 Sidney D. Strollings 


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AZAA Richard L. Langstaff 




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Back Row. L-R 


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AK2 Jackie L. Earlywine 


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AD1 David E. Fleming 


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^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^v^ 


AMS2 Jessee J. Dukes Jr. 


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AVIATION INTERMEDIATE MAINTENANCE DEPARTMENT 

IM-2 / IM-3 / IM-4 DIVISIONS 







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PR1 Clifford Elkins III 
AD3 Michael H. Stafford 
AMH1 Ronald L. Phillips 




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Back Row, L-R 

AMHAA Anthony W. Bosworth 
ADS Daniel C. McCullough 
ADAA Paul Casanova 
AE2 Richard E. Jones 




^^^^^^H 




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^^^^^^^^^V^£ 






L-R 

AT2 Randy L. Long 
AT1 Joseph E. Gilbert Jr. 
ATAN Andrew F. Bramstedt 



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ASM2 Reginald L. Evans 




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ASM2 Chnstian L. Kimball 


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AS1 (AW) Charles E. Dixon 
ASMAM Nicholas A. Beaupre 
ASS Michael A. Luciano 

Back Row. L-R 


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^^^^^^v 


ASEAAJohnD. Martin 


^^^^^^^ 




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ASEAA David A. Gonzales 


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AR Terry D. Brock 
ASMAA Keith L. Painter 
AA Aaron M. Runnels 




IN MEMORIAM 



Master Chief Petty Officer 
Arthur A. McChesney 

Fireman Scott Oswalt 

Airman Richard R. Angelella 
Ship's Servicemen Fermin Colon, Jr. 



Lord, we commend to 

your loving care the souls 

of our fallen shipmates. 



A PERSONAL NOTE FROM OUR CAPTAIN 





29 July 1989 
Norfolk, Virginia 



Dear Friends, 



WASP comes alive today. USS WASP (LHD 1), the tenth ship to bear the name, 
today joins the fleet, ready to take its place as one of the premier ships of the Navy. On 
behalf of the sailors who have served in WASPs and the men who still serve in USS 
WASP (LHD 1), thank you for joining us on this memorable occasion. 

The nine previous WASPs, who came alive in their own separate ways, are gone 
now, but each established a tradition of excellence. Whether supporting the Navy's 
first amphibious assault in 1776, earning victories at sea in the days of sail, serving as 
models of courage in war, or leading in the preservation of peace, USS WASPs have 
served their nation well. We are honored to follow in the wake of the unequalled 
historic record of accomplishment. 

The WASP you see before you today is the culmination of the finest in engineering 
technology and shipbuilding expertise. As a multi-purpose amphibious assault ship, 
USS WASP represents the ultimate platform for the Navy and Marine team. No other 
ship can boast of such state-of-the-art command and control and information process- 
ing capabilities. No other ship can control over-the-horizon heliborne and waterborne 
assault so well while supporting fixed wing vertical take off aircraft. In one quantum 
leap, amphibious warfare has surged into the 21st century. 

At the same time, the magnificent structure that is WASP is the product of superb 
designers and skilled craftsmen. The blending of the Navy and civilian shipbuilding 
team has never been better represented than in USS WASP. As you walk the decks 
this afternoon admire the ship and reflect on the thousands of hours of effort and pride 
that have molded USS WASP. 

The true magic that breathes life into WASP today is her crew. The thousand 
sailors who will steam her, fight her, and bring USS WASP into action today are her 
soul. Starting with a handful of dedicated men in Norfolk and Pascagoula, we have 
grown into a closely-knit team of professionals. Handpicked, the men of USS WASP 
embody the finest in today's Navy. 

Completing the WASP family are the families and friends of our crew; thank you 
for coming today and encouraging our efforts. Thank you, too, to the people of Norfolk 
and Hampton Roads who have allowed us to share this occasion with them. The 
commissioning of USS WASP represents the best that is the Navy, Marine Corps and 
civilian community. 

Welcome and Thank you. 




L. E. Picotte 
Captain, U.S. Navy 




JTION